Opening New Caledonia - Opening New Caledonia - Lesson Plans - Forest Uses
Opening New CaledoniaGo to Home PageFrancais
Exhibit NavigationPage Navigation
Reverend Runnalls
L.C. Gunn Journals and Correspondence
Prince George Maps
Northwood Documents
Northwood Maps
Forest Branch Newsletters
Blake Dickens Forestry Collection
Spacer Image
Search
Overview
Image Use
Site Map
Timeline
Lesson Plans
Glossary
Spacer Image
Explore
CB_BG

Lesson Plans
Forest Uses



Forest Uses

Grade Level

  • Grade 5

Main Idea

Forests are an important part in people's lives, whether they are for fun or work. Without respect and recycling, forests loose their value to humans and animals.

Subjects Covered

  • English Language Arts
  • Fine Arts
  • Science

Objectives

Students will be able to describe:

  • Ways to recycle
  • Why forests are important to humans
  • How humans use forests

Teacher Notes

A "Teacher Background Information" handout is available for additional teaching notes.

Materials

  • "Recycle Track Sheet" handout
  • "Amazing Forests" handout
  • "Forest Facts" handout
  • Scrapbook
    • 1 scrapbook in which the pages can be taken out
    • Glue
    • Scissors
    • Construction Paper
    • Magazines for clippings
    • Felt Pens/pencil crayon

Vocabulary

Recycle:
to process (as liquid body waste, glass, or cans) in order to regain material for human use.
Reuse:
to use again especially after reclaiming or reprocessing.
Reduce:
to diminish in size, amount, extent, or number.

Outline

  1. Discuss with class what they think the definition of recycle is. Once all thoughts have been collected, read the Webster's Dictionary definition to class.
    1. DEFINITION: to pass again through a series of changes or treatments.
  2. Ask class what are some ways of recycling. Touch on the 3R's. Use the "Teacher Background" information sheet to help stimulate discussion.
    1. 3R's
      1. Reuse
      2. Reduce
      3. Recycle
  3. Distribute the "Recycle Track Sheet" to each student.
  4. Have students keep track in groups of 5 for one week of their lunches.
  5. At then end of the week make a total of all groups on the board.
  6. Discuss ways to reduce the numbers shown on the board of each item. For instance, the number of juice boxes to recycle etc.
  7. Ask students how recycling can help the forests. Use the "Teacher Background" information sheet to stimulate discussion.
  8. Distribute the "Amazing Forests" worksheet for students to complete.
  9. Ask students to think about their answers. Explain to class that these answers are why forests are so important. Have a few students give examples of their answers.
  10. Distribute the "Forest Facts" worksheet to each student. Have students fill in the blanks as teacher reads "Teacher Facts" from the "Teacher Background" information sheet.
  11. Create a "Forest Uses Scrapbook"
    1. Give student a piece of paper from the scrapbook.
    2. Have class design a forest use on the paper provided.
    3. They may use felts, magazine clippings, construction paper and other decorative materials.
    4. After each student has created his or her page, put the scrapbook together for display in the classroom.

Resources

www.theexplorationplace.com

Teacher Background Information

Recycling

Recycle:

  • Take pop cans to recycle depot
  • Take cardboard to depot
  • Tires

Reuse:

  • Reuse sandwich bags
  • Reuse grocery bags
  • Wrapping paper and bows at Christmas time

Reduce:

  • Don't let the water run in the sink when brushing your teeth
  • Air pollution by waking or riding your bike
  • Use a compost to reduce house hold garbage
  • Turn heat down in house while no one is home
  • Turn off lights when a room is empty

Recycling for the Forests

  • Fewer trees cut down for products such as paper
  • Less pollution for the forest floor.

Teacher Facts

Canada has the 2nd largest forest area on earth. When gathered together, forests would cover ½ of Canada's land. 70% of timber production, like boards for houses, comes from the Interior of British Columbia, where the other 30% comes from the Coast. 49% of all the forests in Canada are timber productive, meaning that trees are able to be cut down for paper, lumber and plywood. If 49% of forests in BC can be used then they remaining 51% can not be used. The 51% of forests may be used for other things such as:

  • Grazing land for animals
  • Recreation area
  • Protected areas
  • Wildlife habitat

Recycle Track Sheet

Keep track for 5 days of everything that you recycle at lunch time.

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
Paper      
Foil     
Cans     
Bottles     
Juice     
Box      
Plastic     
Food     
Scraps     
Total     

Amazing Forests

Name 4 things that we use forests for:

FUN

WORK

Forest Facts

Fill in the blanks as teacher reads information on forest facts.

Canada has the                     largest forest area on earth.                     of timber production, like logs for houses, comes from the Interior of British Columbia, where the other 30% comes from the                    . 49% of all the forests in Canada are timber productive, meaning that trees are able to be cut down for paper, logs and plywood. If 49% of forests in BC can be used then they remaining                     can not be used. The 51% of forests may be used for other things such as:

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  
  4.  

Forest Facts

Answer Key

Canada has the         2nd         largest forest area on earth.         70%         of timber production, like logs for houses, comes from the Interior of British Columbia, where the other 30% comes from the        coast       . 49% of all the forests in Canada are timber productive, meaning that trees are able to be cut down for paper, logs and plywood. If 49% of forests in BC can be used then they remaining         51%         can not be used. The 51% of forests may be used for other things such as:

  1. grazing land for animals
  2. recreation areas
  3. wildlife habitat
  4. protected areas

Photographic History of Prince George
| Milltown to Downtown | Settlers' Effects |

Opening New Caledonia | Project Credits | Contact Us | Feedback |
©2004 The Exploration Place at the Fraser-Fort George Regional Museum

This site is financed in part by the federal government; your opinion counts!
What do you think of this site?