Opening New Caledonia - Opening New Caledonia - Timeline 1944
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1944

The Prince George Junior Chamber of Commerce began promoting civic pride by advertising to home owners, encouraging them to display their house numbers. The City was no longer so small that everyone in town knew every house. The ads read "Keep Up With the Progress of Our City. Put up Your House Numbers. If you do not know what your house number is, call or phone the City Hall."

During a summer City Council meeting, approval was given to enforce a cement sidewalk program to end "the long reign of wooden sidewalks in Prince George." The plan was to charge property owners 75 per cent of the cost, while the City absorbed 25 per cent. Owners could pay for the sidewalks in front of their properties by scheduling payments over a period of several years.

On Thanksgiving Day, the Prince George Hotel hosted an official opening to show off its bright, new look. The café had been renovated to accommodate the diner-style eating that was popular in the 1940s. A long counter accommodated customers on upholstered stools, and the rest of the area was divided into booths for two, four, six or twelve people. A private dining room was configured to seat fifteen. Decorators appointed the room using pale yellow with buff accents and a red trim for contrast. Renovations to the ballroom gave it a new shiny linoleum dance floor and a specialized ventilation system for temperature control.

Mayor A. M. Patterson served his last year leading the civic government in 1944. He took a frugal approach to managing City finances and even through the Depression years managed to keep the City from going into debt. He was the City's longest-serving mayor, having served eighteen consecutive terms since being elected mayor for the first time in 1927. His Council for the final year in office was: J. N. Keller, W.R. Munro, F. Clark, J. Nicholson, W. E. Kirschke, and F. D. Taylor.

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