Opening New Caledonia - Opening New Caledonia - Timeline 1929
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1929

During the late 1920s, gifted singer, dancer and local impresario, Inga Anderson organized entertainment spectacles for the City of Prince George. Her annual dance recital at the Princess Theatre featured local performers and showcased her pupils in every aspect of her dancing school curriculum. She performed two solo dances and choreographed the rest of the show. The 1929 performance was typical. The three-hour performance comprised 36 numbers and featured 53 performers. The next year, she left for Hollywood where she starred in motion pictures. She went on to perform on the club circuit in London's Mayfair district.

In their deliberations over the possible acquisition of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, both the CNR and CPR studied the economic potential for developing natural resources in northern British Columbia. An extensive survey examined the forest and mining potential and the potential revenue which could accrue to the railway should industry be developed. It was hoped that the results would prove encouraging, and that the railway would be completed. Those expectations were dashed with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 which sunk North America into an economic depression.

In November, A. D. Cruickshank of Prince George piloted a Western Canada Airways plane during the successful rescue of a party missing at Cambridge Bay in the Arctic Circle.

A new product reached Prince George in the spring - Gyproc fireproof wallboard was advertised as a means to cover walls and ceilings to make them "cooler on hot days and warmer on cold nights." Advertisements claimed the product could be purchased "at trivial cost" and would make a home "look twice as attractive."


Photographic History of Prince George
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